Ten projects that show Toronto condo development is still going strong

One Bloor West - photo credit Mizrahi

When plans for an 80-storey Toronto condo development at the southwest corner of Bloor and Yonge were unveiled earlier this year, Torontonians reacted with a predictable range of emotions, including deep worry and angst. Online commenters fretted not only about the physical appearance of the proposal – dramatically named ‘The One’ – but also the congestion it might bring to the neighbourhood, the shadow it would cast, the effect it might have on the bird population, and, of course, the shadowy, ubiquitous threat of “Manhattanization.”

While some reservations are understandable when confronted with a proposal of this stature, Globe and Mail columnist Marcus Gee wrote on March 18 that “Toronto has finally found the confidence to act like a big city,” perhaps suggesting that The One ought to be celebrated, if only for its ambition.

In that spirit, let’s have a look at nine more confident projects:

One Bloor East - Great Gulf Homes

One Bloor East

Directly across Yonge Street from the possible future location of The One sits One Bloor East, a 257-metre, 76-storey mixed use space which is nearing completion. Urban Toronto recently shared some images from the unfinished penthouse suites of the building, and the views are spectacular.

Mirvish+Gehry

 

Mirvish+Gehry

Before ‘The One,’ the Mirvish+Gehry was arguably the most controversial proposal in Toronto. The massive, two-building Toronto condo development (the taller of the two towers will reach over 300 metres) is likely to be located in the heart of downtown, at 260 King St West. The preservation of the Princess of Wales theatre is an important aspect of the proposal, as earlier plans included its demolition.

1 7 yonge photo via urban toronto

1-7 Yonge Street

At the foot of Yonge St, in a space currently dominated by the Toronto Star building and several parking lots, Pinnacle International is hoping to erect an impressive selection of six new buildings. The proposal would redefine two underused city blocks, and the tallest new building would be the third on this list to reach 300 metres.

10 york tridelTen York Street

Ten York is particularly interesting for its shape: the 67-storey, wedge-shaped building is located immediately south of the notorious Gardiner Expressway, and directly north of the Yonge-Bay-York off-ramp. While living between two separate portions of the Gardiner may not appeal to all, the building is indicative of the densification Toronto’s southern downtown core is experiencing.

themasseytower dot comMassey Tower

Expected to be completed next year, the 207-metre Massey Tower incorporates two historic bank buildings in its design. The Bank of Commerce on Yonge St just north of Queen will be restored and will serve as the new condo’s lobby.

385 yonge

385 Yonge St

The development proposed for 385 Yonge St may be the most shocking design proposal on this list. It includes two towers at 62 and 73 storeys, respectively, which will be joined by a large platform roughly two-thirds of the way up the shorter of the two. Situated just north of Yonge and Dundas Square, this Toronto condo development could be a true architectural landmark.

soleilEau du Soleil

Eau du Soleil is the furthest Toronto condo development from downtown on this list, located on Lake Shore Blvd West, on the Humber Bay Shores. The striking, two-tower design of the building will stand out among smaller, more conservative developments in the area.

88 Scott Concert properties

88 Scott Street

Currently under construction, 88 Scott St will top out at approximately 200 metres, and will feature a range of amenities to go along with an outstanding central location. The podium levels will include retail, restaurants, and commercial office spaces below 525 residential units.

33 Gerrard - Great Eagle Holdings33 Gerrard West

The 33 Gerrard West Redevelopment is the newest proposal on this list. Currently occupied by the Eaton Chelsea Hotel, the location could soon feature four new towers at heights of 80, 74, 50, and 46 storeys. For the moment, details on the proposal are scant, but early renderings suggest an international style-influenced design which would stand out beside glassy neighbours Aura and 385 Yonge.

Each imaginative Toronto condo development on this list will contribute to the growth and maturation of Ontario’s capital. Visit Renting Toronto today for listings of available condos for rent in Toronto. We’ve been in the business of connecting qualified tenants and reliable landlords since 1999.

What information can a landlord legally ask for?

Every landlord hopes to find good tenants to stay in their rental property.

When it comes time to choose a renter, landlords should do their due diligence in evaluating any potential renters since it’s in your best interest. No one wants to deal with the headache of a problem renter and this way you protect yourself and your investment by choosing the right person.

While landlords may want to know everything about a renter to help them make a decision, there are some questions landlords are not legally allowed to base their decision on.

What can a landlord ask renters about?

When a landlord meets a potential tenant for the first time, they likely want to know as much about you as you want to know about the property.

Some questions they’re allowed to ask include what your current job is and how much income you earn in a year. While this may seem too personal to you, this helps a landlord evaluate whether you earn enough to consistently pay rent on time. Landlords may also ask you to provide proof of employment from your employer since this verifies your job situation.

To learn more about a person’s financial situation, landlords are legally allowed to ask a potential renter for written permission for a credit check. While a person’s income gives landlord’s idea of how much money the renter earns, the credit check paints a better picture of the amount of debt a person is responsible for and whether they can afford their debt payments and expenses with their income. This helps a landlord ensure they won’t be stiffed on their monthly rent.

The number of people living in the space and who they are is also a question your landlords can ask. If there are other adults, a landlord may ask for their proof of employment as well. All homes are built in a way that follows health and fire safety regulations and landlords will need to know the number of people living on the property to ensure they’re follow these laws.

While renters see owning pets or smoking as their own personal choices, a landlord is allowed to ask a tenant these questions since they could be concerned that these choices will affect their property value. Landlords aren’t allowed to charge a monthly pet rent, but they can charge a pet damage deposit to renters. Each province and territory has its own pet deposit legislation, so be sure to check out details on what’s legally allowed.

A landlord may also ask for a reference, which could be your past landlord, and their contact information since they’ll want to learn more about how you are as a tenant. They might ask your previous landlord whether you paid your rent on time, whether they received many complaints while you were staying there or whether you took care of the property.

What can landlords not ask renters about?

There are some queries landlords aren’t allowed to ask potential renters about since they could infringe on a person’s human rights.

Here are a few examples:

  1. Do you plan to have more children?
  2. What is your ethnic background, religion or sexual preference?
  3. Will your family be visiting?
  4. What is your Social Insurance Number (SIN)?
  5. Are you married, single or divorced?

Visit Renting Toronto for listings on available places for rent in Toronto. Before looking for a place to live, first have a good idea on what you want to look for. Our company has been in the business of placing competent, qualified tenants in owners and landlord’s properties since 1999 and owners have the final say on all prospective tenants.

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