How to have a smooth moving day

It can be a long process to find a place you want to move into, undergo reference checks and credit checks and sign a lease. If you’ve done all these steps, then everything is ready for you to move in. All you need to do is move your life into the new space, which can be a challenge in itself.

Moving can be a hectic process, but there are some things you can do to ensure everything runs smoothly and that you have a good moving day.

For starters, decide on a date on when you want to move. If you’re moving from rental property to another, make sure you give your previous landlord sufficient notice. Some renters can afford to pay rent at both places for one month, which makes the move less hectic, but also more costly. Whatever you decide, both your previous landlord and your new landlord need to know when you will be moving out or in.

If you are moving from one condo to another, don’t forget to book the elevator in each building. You will need to provide each building with a security deposit, which is usually a bank draft for $500. This is to ensure that the movers do not damage the elevator or hallways of the building while moving out your property. Once your move is done you get your deposit back.

Keep in mind that some buildings don’t allow moving in or out on Sundays. This can be difficult, especially if the month’s end is on a Sunday and you need to move out earlier. Once you have a date booked, if you are hiring a moving truck or a moving company, book them as soon as possible.

A few weeks before you start moving, it’s important for you start arranging your belongings and prepping boxes ahead of time. Separate your items between what you plan to keep and what you can get rid of, whether you donate it or toss it. Also, label your boxes to make it easier to find everything.

While looking at the items you plan to keep, determine what needs to be taken part before it’s moved and get that done earlier so you’re not trying to take a part your bookshelf on the big day.

Meanwhile, don’t forget to change the address for any bills, banking or credit card statements, magazine subscriptions or important documents. Even after you move, either set a forwarding address for the leftover mail to be sent out or notify your previous landlord that you may drop by on occasion to pick up any mail that continues to be sent to that address. You may also want/need to purchase tenants’ insurance and if you’re doing so, contact your insurance company ahead of time to notify them of the change in residence.

Also a day before the move, confirm with the moving company the time they’re expected to arrive and the location to avoid any confusion or delays. You should also have the keys or have an appointment set up with your new landlord to receive them on the day of your move.

On the day of the move, you should have a bag/box packed with all essential, which should be clearly labelled. http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-have-a-smooth-moving-day/ http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-have-a-smooth-moving-day/ http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-have-a-smooth-moving-day/If you’re moving out from another rental property, make sure the fridge is clean and any other leftover food items are either packed or tossed. Once all the boxes are moved, inspect the space to ensure you have everything.

Once you arrive at the new location, unload all your belongings and settle into your new home!

Renting Toronto has been in the business of placing competent, qualified tenants in owners and landlord’s properties since 1999. Our company has full time dedicated agents renting properties on behalf of owners and owners have the final say on all prospective tenants. Our website receives thousands of hits monthly and as a Homeowner or Landlord you can display your rental property on our website at a very low cost compared to our competitors!

How to handle issues with your landlord

When you rent from a landlord, it’s always in both of your best interests to have a good relationship. Unfortunately, sometimes this doesn’t always happen.

Renters should be aware of their rights as a tenant and how to appropriately handle any issue to avoid any legal repercussions.

Does my landlord have the right to visit?

Renters may not realize it, but landlords have various situations where they’re allowed to enter the property, with or without notice. It’s in both people’s best interests to know ahead of time. In Ontario, landlords may enter without notice due to an emergency, if the tenant decides to let them in, if it was decided that the landlord will need to regularly visit to clean the rental unit and if both the tenant and landlord have agreed to end their rental agreement, the landlord can show the space to other prospective tenants without notice.

Besides these scenarios, landlords are expected to give renters at least 24 hours written notice before stopping by, which should include details such as why the landlord needs to stop by and when the landlord plans to visit. While a landlord is allowed to stop by, landlords are expected to limit the number of times they visit.

In Ontario, tenants may deny the landlord entry if it doesn’t follow the Residential Tenancies Act, but it being an inconvenient time isn’t a good reason to.

What issues might you encounter?

When you rent a property, it’s expected that both you and the landlord will come to an agreement into who will handle property maintenance, such as snow shovelling or mowing the lawn, and that certain rules may be set.

If you’re renting an apartment, it’s expected that you’re living in a manner that follows the building’s rules, such as avoiding excessive noise at night or not smoking indoors if it’s against the building’s rules. If you live in a way that violates the city’s bylaws, the police can be called which may lead to warnings or fines.

The landlord has the right to ask a tenant to either clean up their space, if it’s extremely dirty, or make repairs to the unit, if they damaged it, through either a verbal or written request. http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-handle-issues-with-your-landlord/ http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-handle-issues-with-your-landlord/If you don’t comply, the landlord may take their issue up with the rental authority. If you feel that you’ve been wrongfully accused of a situation, you may need to gather proof and witnesses to show otherwise.

Meanwhile, landlords are expected to complete emergency repairs in a timely manner, but tenants must be aware that they’re not allowed to withhold rent as leverage since that could lead to your eviction.

 

What information can a landlord legally ask for?

Every landlord hopes to find good tenants to stay in their rental property.

When it comes time to choose a renter, landlords should do their due diligence in evaluating any potential renters since it’s in your best interest. No one wants to deal with the headache of a problem renter and this way you protect yourself and your investment by choosing the right person.

While landlords may want to know everything about a renter to help them make a decision, there are some questions landlords are not legally allowed to base their decision on.

What can a landlord ask renters about?

When a landlord meets a potential tenant for the first time, they likely want to know as much about you as you want to know about the property.

Some questions they’re allowed to ask include what your current job is and how much income you earn in a year. While this may seem too personal to you, this helps a landlord evaluate whether you earn enough to consistently pay rent on time. Landlords may also ask you to provide proof of employment from your employer since this verifies your job situation.

To learn more about a person’s financial situation, landlords are legally allowed to ask a potential renter for written permission for a credit check. While a person’s income gives landlord’s idea of how much money the renter earns, the credit check paints a better picture of the amount of debt a person is responsible for and whether they can afford their debt payments and expenses with their income. This helps a landlord ensure they won’t be stiffed on their monthly rent.

The number of people living in the space and who they are is also a question your landlords can ask. If there are other adults, a landlord may ask for their proof of employment as well. All homes are built in a way that follows health and fire safety regulations and landlords will need to know the number of people living on the property to ensure they’re follow these laws.

While renters see owning pets or smoking as their own personal choices, a landlord is allowed to ask a tenant these questions since they could be concerned that these choices will affect their property value. Landlords aren’t allowed to charge a monthly pet rent, but they can charge a pet damage deposit to renters. Each province and territory has its own pet deposit legislation, so be sure to check out details on what’s legally allowed.

A landlord may also ask for a reference, which could be your past landlord, and their contact information since they’ll want to learn more about how you are as a tenant. They might ask your previous landlord whether you paid your rent on time, whether they received many complaints while you were staying there or whether you took care of the property.

What can landlords not ask renters about?

There are some queries landlords aren’t allowed to ask potential renters about since they could infringe on a person’s human rights.

Here are a few examples:

  1. Do you plan to have more children?
  2. What is your ethnic background, religion or sexual preference?
  3. Will your family be visiting?
  4. What is your Social Insurance Number (SIN)?
  5. Are you married, single or divorced?

Visit Renting Toronto for listings on available places for rent in Toronto. Before looking for a place to live, first have a good idea on what you want to look for. Our company has been in the business of placing competent, qualified tenants in owners and landlord’s properties since 1999 and owners have the final say on all prospective tenants.

What should you look for when renting a property?

When you rent a place to live, there’s a lot that goes into your decision on where you decide you live. Before you start browsing property listings for available rooms, first figure out what you need in a space.

Cost: For most people, this is a deciding factor when they look at places to live. Always set a budget of what space you can realistically afford. If you miss payments, you may find yourself on facing an eviction notice. When meeting with any potential landlords, you’ll want to know whether the cost of the place covers monthly rent and utilities or if those need to be paid for separately. Also, learn about your tenant rights, including whether your province is regulated by rent controls.

Location: If you’re going to school or working, chances are you want to live a short distance or a short commute away. If you need to take public transit, keep an eye out for your possible routes, or if you have a car, make sure the place you’re renting has parking available and if not, where you can park. Your mode of transportation also affects what you’d like in your neighbourhood. For example, if you don’t have a car, you may want to live in an area with a nearby grocery store, a pharmacy or a bank. If you have children, you may want to live in a place near a park or near a smaller road that doesn’t see as much traffic.

Number of occupants: The number of people living in the space will determine the number of bedrooms you will need to rent. If you have children, seniors or anyone who’s physically disabled who will be renting with you, you will want to take their needs into consideration. The number of rooms you will need will also affect your budget since in certain areas, such as downtown, it’ll be more expensive to find a two- or three-bedroom space compared to renting in the suburbs.

What type of building you want to live in: Some renters may be pickier about this aspect compared to others. Typically renting a basement suite is more inexpensive compared to renting in a townhouse, but you may not be a fan of the lack of sunlight.

What does the space include: If you’re looking to rent a room in a house, you’ll want to know whether it comes with any furniture or if you’ll need to bring your own, which will affect your costs. On the other hand, if you’re looking to a rent a condo, you’ll want to know whether the unit comes with laundry, whether it’s in the suite or located in another part of the building, as well as the other amenities you can access, such as patios, a gym, a pool, an entertainment room or a BBQ. Some of these features you may be adamant on having, while others may not be as important to you.

While your preferences may change as you view properties for rent, it’s always important to have a general idea what you’re looking for so you can make a quick decision, if needed.

If you’re a first-time renter in Toronto, these commonly asked Renter FAQs will help you find the right place to live.

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