How to handle issues with your landlord

When you rent from a landlord, it’s always in both of your best interests to have a good relationship. Unfortunately, sometimes this doesn’t always happen.

Renters should be aware of their rights as a tenant and how to appropriately handle any issue to avoid any legal repercussions.

Does my landlord have the right to visit?

Renters may not realize it, but landlords have various situations where they’re allowed to enter the property, with or without notice. It’s in both people’s best interests to know ahead of time. In Ontario, landlords may enter without notice due to an emergency, if the tenant decides to let them in, if it was decided that the landlord will need to regularly visit to clean the rental unit and if both the tenant and landlord have agreed to end their rental agreement, the landlord can show the space to other prospective tenants without notice.

Besides these scenarios, landlords are expected to give renters at least 24 hours written notice before stopping by, which should include details such as why the landlord needs to stop by and when the landlord plans to visit. While a landlord is allowed to stop by, landlords are expected to limit the number of times they visit.

In Ontario, tenants may deny the landlord entry if it doesn’t follow the Residential Tenancies Act, but it being an inconvenient time isn’t a good reason to.

What issues might you encounter?

When you rent a property, it’s expected that both you and the landlord will come to an agreement into who will handle property maintenance, such as snow shovelling or mowing the lawn, and that certain rules may be set.

If you’re renting an apartment, it’s expected that you’re living in a manner that follows the building’s rules, such as avoiding excessive noise at night or not smoking indoors if it’s against the building’s rules. If you live in a way that violates the city’s bylaws, the police can be called which may lead to warnings or fines.

The landlord has the right to ask a tenant to either clean up their space, if it’s extremely dirty, or make repairs to the unit, if they damaged it, through either a verbal or written request. http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-handle-issues-with-your-landlord/ http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-handle-issues-with-your-landlord/If you don’t comply, the landlord may take their issue up with the rental authority. If you feel that you’ve been wrongfully accused of a situation, you may need to gather proof and witnesses to show otherwise.

Meanwhile, landlords are expected to complete emergency repairs in a timely manner, but tenants must be aware that they’re not allowed to withhold rent as leverage since that could lead to your eviction.

 

How to rent an apartment with bad credit

Many landlords conduct credit checks on potential tenants since it gives them an idea of how likely they are to pay their rent on time based on how well they manage paying their other debts.

But if you made some financial mistakes in the past, you may find that it will come back to haunt you when it comes time to find a place to rent. Most derogatory information will remain on your credit report for about six years, which is why you need to manage your credit well, avoid paying your bills late or defaulting on any loans.

If it’s unfortunately already happened, be aware that you may face a tougher time when it comes to finding a place to live and give yourself extra time to find a place to call home.

Before your start your apartment search, the first step is to check your credit report. This way you won’t be surprised by any unexpected issues. This is important since your bank or another service provider may have made a mistake in processing your bills or your identity may have been stolen and you’re left on the hook. If this is the case, get in touch with the financial institution and the credit reporting bureaus to resolve the issue and ensure that a note is made about the problem if it isn’t cleared up right away.

If your credit rating is due to a financial mistake on your own accord, the best thing you can do when applying to move out is to be upfront and honest about the issue. Get your previous landlord as a reference to vouch for you and you might consider attaching a letter or a receipt from your previous landlord or an explanation letter about the situation.

If you’re able to demonstrate good proof of employment, solid income and good references, landlords may not solely base their decision on the results of your credit report.

Landlords are legally allowed to reject potential tenants based on their credit reports and your best bet is not to try and hide your previous mistakes, but rather show recent evidence that you have paid your bills or rent on time.

A landlord may choose to accept you as a tenant, but they may request you to have a guarantor or a co-signer for your rental application. While you will be the person renting the property, your guarantor will be responsible for covering the rent if you miss a payment. Make sure you talk to close friends or family before submitting their name in your application.

Another way to entice a landlord to rent to you is offering them a higher security deposit to assuage their fears, offer to sign a shorter term lease so you’re able to prove yourself first or offer to move in right away.

It may take longer, but you should be able to find a place to rent, though you may not have as many choices. http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-rent-an-apartment-with-bad-credit/ http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-rent-an-apartment-with-bad-credit/Don’t be deterred by the situation and continue to monitor your credit report accordingly to prevent any future issues from putting a damper in your renting plans.

Renting Toronto will always conduct credit checks when consider renters for condos for rent in Toronto. Our company has been in the business of placing competent, qualified tenants in owners and landlord’s properties since 1999 and owners have the final say on all prospective tenants.

How to find a condo to rent?

If you’re looking to find an apartment or a condo to rent, there are many ways you can go about finding a place to live.

There are rental magazines or postings on bulletin boards, but the best place to look is online. Visiting rental listing websites will let you sort property options based on their amenities, the number of occupants and the location. This way you’re not browsing through rental options that are nowhere near your ideal living location and it’s not as daunting since you can easily narrow down your choices.

Also, it’s easy to put up and remove a listing online, which means when searching, you’re accessing the most up-to-date listings out there.

Another important aspect of these websites is that they typically show images of the property, which gives renters a glimpse into how the space looks. Many renters judge a rental property by the pictures before they go ahead and set up a viewing appointment.

But just because you can browse listings online, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t visit the place. Online listings should help you limit your choices, but seeing that the property matches your expectations is important too.

A viewing appointment lets you verify the details that’s mentioned on the listing and it also gives you a chance to chat with the landlord and ask any questions you may have, such as what utility payments and maintenance will you be responsible for. If possible, see if you can get references from any past renters to hear about their experiences, before agreeing to move in.

If everything is to your liking, make sure to get in touch with the landlord or the property management company right away since some listings may be in demand.

Once you’ve mentioned your interest in renting the property, your landlord will likely request proof of employment, a credit check, content insurance and any past references before approving you as a renter. http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-find-a-condo-to-rent/ http://rentingtoronto.com/how-to-find-a-condo-to-rent/Have these ready to ahead of time to ensure a quick and smooth transaction. They may also request you to sign a lease agreement, which if you do, read the terms of your stay to ensure you’re aware of any costs and responsibilities associated with renting the property.

Once that’s squared away, if needed, give appropriate notice to your current landlord and prepare for your move.

If you’re a first-time renter in Toronto, these commonly asked Renter FAQs will help you find the right place to live. Visit Renting Toronto for listings on available places for rent in Toronto. Our company has been in the business of placing competent, qualified tenants in owners and landlord’s properties since 1999 and owners have the final say on all prospective tenants.

What is a credit check?

When a landlord is choosing a prospective renter, they have the right to ask for written permission to request a credit report.

Credit checks shed some valuable insight into your financial situation, which could influence a landlord to either accept you as a tenant or reject you.

What is a credit report?

A credit report details information about any loans you’ve taken out within the last six years, along with how often you meet your payment deadlines. The report also offer details about the credit cards under your name and the amount of credit you have at your disposal and how much you have used.

Before hunting for a place to rent, renters should request a free copy of their credit report from the credit reporting agencies, Equifax and TransUnion, to see their current status. These reports will also include a credit score, which is based on your use of credit to come up with a score. This score is based on multiple factors, such as the type of credit you use, your payment history, the amount you owe on credit, the length of your credit history and any new credit you may have applied for.

How can you improve your credit report score?

If it’s the first time you’ve checked your credit score and you’re shocked by your standing, you’ll be glad to hear that the score isn’t set in stone.

Some people may have no credit history, which while this means they haven’t borrowed money, it also doesn’t offer any insight into your financial risk. In a case like this, you may need to provide a guarantor letter which will names a family member or close friend to be liable for the rent if you are unable to pay. Meanwhile, the best way to start filling your credit report is by properly managing your credit card use since this way any potential landlords will see you as a responsible individual.

If you made mistakes when using credit, whether it’s by making a late payment or racking up a great deal of debt with your credit card, the only way to improve your credit score is to practice good money habits, and wait for your past behaviour to fall off the report. Make sure you pay any loans and bill payments on time and as your good habits continue over time, the weight of your old habits will affect your score less and less.

Both positive and negative information will stay on file for about six years, which is why it’s important to adopt good financial habits right off the bat. Depending on the type of negative information, whether it’s a bankruptcy or a late bill payment, the timelines differ with the amount of time it stays on your file.

To avoid any ugly surprises, check your credit report before looking for a place to rent. If the results aren’t as great as you’d like, follow through with good habits to improve your report overtime.

The information provided in your credit report is useful to landlords since it offers them a glimpse into the amount of debt you’re carrying, whether you have enough money to make your payments and whether you have a history of paying in a timely manner. This info coupled with your letter of employment, which details your income, will offer the landlord a barometer into your financial picture, which may either encourage them or dissuade them from renting to you.

Renting Toronto will always conduct credit checks when consider renters for condos for rent in Toronto. Our company has been in the business of placing competent, qualified tenants in owners and landlord’s properties since 1999 and owners have the final say on all prospective tenants.

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